Competition vs. reality, part whatever

In my previous posts I’ve pointed out how competitive shooting, and even more so, competition-orientated training, can be quite beneficial for shooters who are only concerned with the street.  I’ve also pointed out the opposite point of view, too.  Both are true, of course.

Here’s another thing to to consider: round count.  And here’s the back story.  Some years  ago my business partner (a competitive shooter) and I put on a match with all proceeds to benefit a children’s cancer research charity.  I wanted to make the stages more realistic than any I’d ever seen.  (I think we succeeded, but how we did is another story.)  When we were discussing the round count of each stage, I wanted to keep it to 3 or 4, mimicking reality.  His exact words were: “I wouldn’t bother to show up for a match with stages of that low of a round count.”  And because we were trying to attract shooters and raise money, we went with high round count stages.

So I wonder, and I mean that literally – I wonder – if  the runnin-and-gunnin/high-round-count/fun-beats-training of most IDPA and IPSC matches isn’t a dis-service to the shooters in them that also carry on the street…in addition to the programming of poor use of cover, shooting too fast, moving WAY too fast, lack of comms training, lack of assessment of what’s in front of the muzzle, and all the other downsides of relatively too much competitive shooting.

I’m not dissing competitive shooting – I need to do more of it.  I’m just putting this out there for consideration.

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4 thoughts on “Competition vs. reality, part whatever

  1. In my experience, it all comes down to mindset and course design. While low round count is the norm for a self defense shooting, higher round counts are not unheard of.

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    • Even when I was competing regularly, most of my range time was spent shooting strings of 4 or fewer rounds and at least 95% was spent shooting strings of 8 or less. In my opinion, both the positives and negatives of competitive shooting are governed by the mindset of the shooter.

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  2. in addition to the programming of poor use of cover, shooting too fast, moving WAY too fast, lack of comms training, lack of assessment of what’s in front of the muzzle,

    I’ve read Paul Howe saying the exact same thing.

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